Sunday, January 16, 2022

The Rarity of Snow & the Resolve to Find Good Books

 

After the snowstorm.

Twitter taught us the rules of engagement: Apologize, apologize.  If, like me, you're not on Twitter, you do not know which subjects are controversial.  But in 2012 or 2013, a commenter complained, "You're so negative.  There's always something wrong."

Well, usually there is something wrong. Negativity can be a catalyst for change.  And yet I thought I was, comparatively speaking, Betsy in the Betsy-Tacy books.  I may have lamented the decline of the use of the subjunctive, a bad novel, climate change, or a businessman's fulminations against the liberal arts.  But I was astonished less by the offended commenter than I was to learn that anyone read my blog.

So, Dear Offended Ones, let me tell you I am feeling happy about the snowstorm. The snow is deep and gorgeous. I like crunching through knee-deep snow.  I am not making snow angels - I prefer to stay inside with a good book.  But now that we have snow again, I am reminded that our new alternate reality, spring-like winters, diverges significantly from the norm. You wail, "The glaciers are melting, the seas are rising!"  Yet the human response has been disorganized and insufficient.  Scientists collaborated to fix the ozone layer; they know how to slow climate change.  Deadline: 2030.

Two quotidian memories of snowstorms:  My parents, tired of being cooped up after a blizzard, decided to take us to a movie. My young, immature father swerved the car from side to side on icy streets,  which we thought very funny - but my poor mother! 

Another time, my husband and I layered up when it was 15 below zero and JOGGED a mile on icy snowbanks to go to the movies.

Anything to get out after a snowstorm.

THE TEMPTATION OF "MOST ANTICIPATED" BOOK LISTS.  Many favorite bloggers have posted "Most Anticipated Books of 2022" lists.  I love looking at the pretty covers, but honestly?  The publishers' blurbs don't tell me much. Big books are big business, and I favor funding the publishing industry!  But how does one find the lesser-known literary novels that appeal more?  It's the chance of reading a review or stumbling upon the books at a bookstore.


9 comments:

  1. I am still trying to figure out what "the decline of the use of the subjunctive" means.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hee, hee. I think of it as the realm of possibility. The Johnny Cash song: "If I WERE a carpenter, WOULD you...?" May, might, would, etc. Anyway, you use it correctly!

      Delete
  2. Ignore people who want you to censure or dumb down yourself. (It's easy to look up the subjunctive.) If anything, your blog is far more upbeat than the realities of the events and books you review.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad to be called upbeat. Anoka Tony was joking, though.

      Delete
  3. 8love the expression "Offended Ones", it so aptly describes the Twitter cancellation crowd. Ellen's advice is right on the nail.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I never hear anything good about Twitter. Alas!

    ReplyDelete